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A Century of Lunar Photography and Beyond

March 5, 2019

Exhibition

The oldest surviving photographs of the moon were taken from an observatory in Westchester in the 1840s. Just over one hundred years later, in 1969, astronauts took photographs of the Earth from the moon’s surface.

Photographic Plates of the Moon ca. 1850. Attributed to John William Draper
Solar Eclipse, 1925. Johnson Peterson

Between those two-time periods, photographers – living and robotic – used all manner of photographic technology to capture the face of our nearest celestial neighbor, including Rube-Goldberg-esque devices combining photography, analog television, and the mechanical workings of vending machines.

Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin Jr’s Boot on the Lunar Surface, July 20, 1969. Neil A. Armstrong

“A Century of Lunar Photography and Beyond” is a show currently on view at The Hudson River Museum, in Westchester County, in a gallery surrounding the museum’s Planetarium. It brings together a selection of lunar photographs from NASA, the Hastings Historical Society, the Lick Observatory Archive, and private collections. Items range from 19th-century astronomers John and Henry Draper’s earliest experiments – some never before seen in museums – to massive NASA mapping surveys, to high-definition digital photography from lunar orbit.

Prints from Atlas Photographique de la Lune, Publié par l’Observatoire de Paris, 1896–1910. Maurice Loewy and Pierre Henri Puiseux
Prints from Observatory Atlas of the Moon, 1895. Lick Observatory

The exhibition celebrates the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11’s landing on the moon, and complements The Color of the Moon: Lunar Painting in American Art, another exhibition on view at the museum from February 8 to May 12, 2019.

A Century of Lunar Photography and Beyond

February 8 through December 15, 2019
Hudson River Museum
511 Warburton Ave
Yonkers, NY 10701

www.hrm.org

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