P
loading...

Jessica Lange: Highway 61

December 16, 2019

Exhibition

Actress Jessica Lange presents an exhibition of her photography at Howard Greenberg Gallery from November 21, 2019 through January 18, 2020. The exhibition, “Highway 61”, presents a tribute to the storied route which Lange has traveled countless times since her childhood in Northern Minnesota.

Mississippi, 2011-2018  © Jessica Lange, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

Highway 61 originates at the Canadian border, near Grand Portage and runs 1,600 miles along the Mississippi River though the American Midwest and South, rolling through eight states, down to New Orleans.

Arkansas, 2011-2018  © Jessica Lange, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

Over the last seven years, Lange has revisited Highway 61 many times to photograph the historic route. Her photography series reveals the thoughtful and powerful connection Lange continues to maintain towards the people and places in this part of America. Lange has noted that “long stretches of 61 are empty, forlorn, as if in mourning for what has gone missing — the hometowns, the neighborhoods, family farms, factories and mills.”

Minnesota, 2011-2018  © Jessica Lange, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

“It’s a great counterpoint to filmmaking,” Lange has said about photography, “because it’s a private, solitary experience. It’s like writing or painting; it’s something you can do on your own. Acting is a co-dependent art form, and the actor is not in control. And filmmaking definitely informs the decision to photograph something. I’m drawn to situations with a dramatic feel to them as far as lighting or backdrop or people’s presence, the way someone stands.”

 

This exhibition coincides with the publication of Lange’s fourth book “Highway 61”, by PowerHouse.

Jessica Lange: Highway 61

November 21, 2019 – January 18, 2020
Howard Greenberg Gallery
41 E 57th St
New York, NY 10022

www.howardgreenberg.com.

Recent posts
I Can Make You Feel Good
Tyler Mitchell, a 24-year-old photographer and filmmaker based in Brooklyn, aims to revitalize and elevate the Black body in his work by representing people in his own community as joyful and proud. Characterized by a use of natural light and candy-color palettes, his work visualizes a Black utopia contrasting with representations and experiences of reality, while offering a powerful and hopeful counter narrative.
Lower East Side: A Neighborhood’s Photographs
The Lower East Side, one of the most densely populated, multiethnic, and modern places in the country, has been mined by photographers for more than 100 years. While late 19th-century social reformers attempted to show “how the other half lives,” later photographers had a different, and often more personal, relationship with the neighborhood.