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Out of the Box: Camera-less Photography

March 6, 2019

Exhibition

From the earliest days of photography, artists have experimented with ways to record images without the use of a conventional camera apparatus. One of the acknowledged founders of the medium, the British inventor William Henry Fox Talbot, was among the first to make camera-less pictures this way, calling them “photogenic drawings.”

Lace, before February 1845. William Henry Fox Talbot

Starting with Talbot, then moving on to the surrealist “rayograms” of Man Ray and continuing with works by photographers including Robert Heinecken, Ellen Carey, Walead Beshty, and Adam Fuss, the exhibition illustrates the myriad ways in which the materials and techniques of photography can create meaning without a camera.

Asimina obovate (Pawpaw), 2007. Jerry Burchfield

“Out of the Box”, a new exhibition at Norton Museum of Art in Florida, presents 50 works in this tradition, primarily drawn from the museum’s permanent collection of photography, most of which have never been shown publicly.

Untitled (photogram created with four circles in diagonal grid), 1944. Stephen J. Singer
Untitled (photogram abstraction created from geometric diamond pattern), 1944. Stephen J. Singer

Out of the Box: Camera-less Photography

Until June 18, 2019
Norton Museum of Art
1450 S. Dixie Highway
West Palm Beach, Florida 33401

www.norton.org

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