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Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness

June 14, 2019

Exhibition

“Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness” is the long-awaited monograph from one of the most powerful visual activists of our time. The book features over ninety of Muholi’s evocative self-portraits, each image drafted from material props in Muholi’s immediate environment.

Zanele Muholi, Bester I, Mayotte, 2015; from Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness (Aperture, 2018)

These portraits reflect the journey, self-image, and possibilities of a black woman in today’s global society. A powerfully arresting collection of work, Muholi’s radical statements of identity, race, and resistance are a direct response to contemporary and historical racisms.

As Muholi states, “I am producing this photographic document to encourage individuals in my community to be brave enough to occupy spaces—brave enough to create without fear of being vilified… To teach people about our history, to rethink what history is all about, to reclaim it for ourselves – to encourage people to use artistic tools such as cameras as weapons to fight back.”

Zanele Muholi, Phindile I, Paris, 2014; from Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness (Aperture, 2018)

With more than twenty written contributions from curators, poets, and authors, alongside luxurious tritone reproductions of Muholi’s images, “Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness” is as much a manifesto of resistance as it is an autobiographical, artistic statement.

Zanele Muholi, Ntozakhe II, Parktown, Johannesburg, 2016; from Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness (Aperture, 2018)

Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness

Published by Aperture
$75

https://aperture.org

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